• CEx18 DWELL kicks off. View of atrium from above.

    CEx18 DWELL kicks off. Photo by Henry Mai.

    Collaborative 2018: CEx18 DWELL | Student Housing as Campus Renewal

    DWELL: Student Housing as Campus Renewal
    12 – 23 January, 2018
    Exhibition Reception: Friday, January 12, 2018 @5:00PM
    Paul H. Cocker Gallery

    DTDFxxWWkAAteX3The Collaborative Exercise is an annual four-day charrette and an integral part of the DAS curriculum; it includes a kick-off presentation, pin-ups, critiques with guest architects and developers, a field trip to two recently completed residences – Campus One and Parkside. The last day of the event will include a juried competition, and gallery exhibition of 30 posters and the giant 1:150 scale campus model with the student housing “interventions.” The four-day event brings together 450 graduate and undergraduate students from the entire program, faculty plus sessional instructors and visiting experts such as Donald Schmitt and Shelagh McCartney. Thirty teams of 15 students working on 15 sites will use their creativity and design skills to brainstorm ideas to improve the appearance, collegiality and identity of the campus while increasing the availability of affordable student housing options. Under-utilized buildings and sites within the campus will be “perched,” “poached,” and “hacked”; a giant 11′ x12′ model of Ryerson University campus is used as a base for the experiments. DWELL (2018) continues in the tradition of past Collaborative Exercises, which addressed a number of important topics related to architectural issues and of public interest.

    These sites within the immediate campus precinct were selected because they are either underdeveloped, inappropriately developed, or have potentially obsolete programme (i.e. parking garage, library book storage, Cineplex etc., big box retail, etc.). Students will design to both improve the quality of the public space and architecture of the existing campus while positing a variety of affordable housing options. These mostly university-owned sites make them tenable for potentially affordable development.

    This project is a great brainstorming exercise that asks students to be “Peer Student Researchers” and “activists” in imagining new forms of housing and alternative notions of construction and addition campus in this context and urgent scenario. Their work will form part of a funded study initiated by Toronto’s four Universities called StudentDwellTO that follows on StudentMoveTO http://www.studentmoveto.ca which similarly studied the mobility/transit crisis of this city.

    These Universities with multiple campuses and approximately 185,000 students provide on-site campus housing for less than 9% of them. Ryerson itself has housing for less than 2% of all students. Including the College, there are more than 320,000 students competing for housing across the GTA. StudentMoveTO identified the dire need for affordable student housing units close to campus as rapidly increasing population density and transit problems in Toronto continue to exacerbate the situation. Students spending inordinate amounts of time commuting to distant family homes not only lose time to study but also miss out on the social interaction and extracurricular activities that define University and College life. Both our students and campuses lose out by not having this socially connected and engaged community activating their campus and local communities 24/7.

    Upon completion of this course students should be able to work collaboratively with a large team over a short deadline and learn how to organize a presentation for a competition format. Students are expected to develop strategies for the design for Student Housing which may be applicable as prototypes for other urban campuses. It is hoped that work from CEx18 will be used to inform the research of StudentDwellTO and form part of a larger study leading to the development of design standards and approaches for increasing the availability, quality and affordability of student housing.

    Please follow CEx18: DWELL on Twitter and Instagram for updates, and use the hashtags #CEx18 and #DASCollab18.

    The exhibition will display all 30 student housing “interventions” along with the 1:150 scale campus model, and will remain open until January 23rd 2018 (inclusive), during regular gallery hours.

    Paul H. Cocker Gallery
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario
    M-T 9am – 5:00pm, F 9am – 4:30pm (closed during the weekend)

    For further information, please contact:

    Alexandra Berceanu
    Communications and Digital & Analogue Archive Specialist
    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353
    E: alexandra.berceanu@ryerson.ca
    http://www.arch.ryerson.ca/

    Collaborative 2018: CEx18 DWELL | Student Housing as Campus RenewalCEx18 DWELL kicks off. View of atrium from above.

    Collaborative 2018: CEx18 DWELL | Student Housing as Campus Renewal

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  • Student presenting proposal to GTAA representatives.

    Photo: Students from Kendra Schank Smith’s fourth-year architecture studio class presented designs for the Pearson Airport Transit Centre to GTAA representatives. Photo by Henry Mai.

    Fourth-Year Undergraduate Architecture Students Propose Designs for Airport Transit Hub

    In 2027, the Greater Toronto Airport Authority (GTAA) will open a vast transit hub connecting Pearson Airport with transportation services from across southern Ontario. The Pearson Airport Transit Centre will accommodate rail, bus, and auto networks while also building new space for shops, cafes, newsstands, offices and lounges. DAS students presented their designs for the Pearson Airport Transit Centre as part of professor Kendra Schank Smith’s fourth-year studio class. The proposals were unveiled on December 8th, 2017, in a presentation attended by GTAA representatives.

    This dialogue between Ryerson and GTAA began when Smith learned of an open call for design proposals and realized how the project could inspire students to explore a range of architectural ideas: long-span construction, multilevel relationships, interconnection of spaces, and the interaction between modes of transportation.

    “The GTAA hadn’t chosen an architect yet, and it occurred to me that this would be really great: they could see some really out-of-the-box examples of what their project might look like. It might even give some ideas to the architects,” said Smith.

    The project also presented an opportunity for students to consider the philosophy of architecture. “Every architecture project has to have an idea behind it,” said Smith. “In this case, it’s intersection: people moving from space to space. People from cities in the whole region come to this transit hub to go to Pearson, or vice versa. What’s exciting about this is it’s light rail, heavy rail, the LRT, the Eglinton line, the UP train, buses, cars—all coming together in one place, and they have to work.”

    After a meeting with GTAA representatives who outlined their expectations, and a trip to the airport to examine the site, students were given space to let their imaginations roam. “It’s a big site,” said student Lynda Ye. “We had to think about what directions transit comes to it, and after that, start detailing the building itself. We had to propose a concept for that building and where it plays in that overall master plan.”

    For her design, Ye separated the building into two different zones:

    “On the north side is where all the commercial retail activity is; on the south side is all the transportation. In between these two sides I have a central space that is the main concourse hall. This is where all the passengers from the transportation modes intersect, and that main space leads to phase two, which is a building that serves the airport.”

    For representatives from the GTAA, the students’ designs were seen through a philosophical lens. “It’s about connectivity: all the passengers coming to and from the airport, the employees, the surrounding community, and the region, allowing our regional transit centre to be a point of connection,” said Hillary Marshall, vice-president, stakeholder relations and communications.

    “We want to see how other people might see the centre,” said Eileen Waechter, director of corporate relations and strategic partnerships for GTAA. “The airport doesn’t just exist for travellers: it exists for the people living around it as well. Getting input from these young architecture students really helps us imagine things differently.”

    Fourth-Year Undergraduate Architecture Students Propose Designs for Airport Transit HubStudent presenting proposal to GTAA representatives.

    Fourth-Year Undergraduate Architecture Students Propose Designs for Airport Transit Hub

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  • Please see the complete schedules below.

    M.Arch Thesis Milestone Presentations and Reviews

    11/12/2017

     

    7228_Henry MaiPhoto by Henry Mai

    Monday, December 11, 2017Thursday, December 14, 2017Various times and locations
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Please join us this week for M.Arch Thesis Milestone Presentations and M.Arch Year 1 Reviews. Graduate students in architecture will present their final projects to their instructors, as well as guest critics from the professional community and academic institutions.

    The following is the schedule for December 11th for M.Arch Year 1 ReviewsAR8101 Studio in Critical Practice – Final Critical Conversation:

     

    Guest Critics:

    Adil Mansure Carlo Parente
    Colin Ripley Chloe Town
    John Cirka Elizabeth George
    June Komisar Gerry Lang
    Michelle Grant John Cirka

     

    9:00 Arrive 1:20 Introductions
    9:05 Introductions 1:30 Dylon Feyen
    9:15 Ryan Fernandes 1:55 Daniel Maj
    9:40 Nikita Yakushev 2:20 Douglas Peterson-Hui
    10:05 Eyad Hachimi 2:45 Heather Breeze
    10:30 Break 3:10 Break
    10:40 Nineveh Rashidzadeh 3:20 Emily Mutch
    11:05 Nahal Rahnamaei 3:45 Arnab Ghosh
    11:30 Stephen Wong 4:10 Kavosh Maleki
    11:55 Kayla Murrell 4:35 John Sirdevan
    12:20 Lunch 5:00 Wrap Up

     

    Follow DAS on Twitter and Instagram and join the conversation using the hashtag #DASReviews. And, check out photos on our Facebook page which will be posted throughout the upcoming week!

    All reviews take place from 8 AM to 6:30 PM (unless otherwise stated).

    M.Arch Thesis Milestone Presentations and ReviewsMArch Reviews Poster - Final - social3

    M.Arch Thesis Milestone Presentations and Reviews

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  • Portrait of Joan Busquets

    Lecture: Joan Busquets

    08/03/2018

    Joan Busquets
    BAU B. Architecture | Urbanism, Barcelona

    Thursday, March 8, 2018
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Live-streaming of this event will be available here. This lecture will be followed by the exhibition opening, Issues for the Future City: Metropolis of Cities.

    Lecture title TBD

    In conjunction with the School of Urban + Regional Planning, Ryerson University

     

    Please register for free admission before attending – registration will open February 2018. This event is free and open to the general public. If you have a Ryerson e-mail address, please use it to register for reserved seating. The “Ryerson” ticket option will appear once the valid e-mail has been provided.

    There is no need to print the confirmation e-mail. The registration confirmation e-mail can be shown at the door, or the name used to register can be provided.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Joan BusquetsPortrait of Joan Busquets

    Lecture: Joan Busquets

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  • Portrait of Christoph Dünser

    Photo courtesy of Hermann Kaufmann Architects

    Lecture: Christoph Dünser

    07/02/2018

    Christoph Dünser
    Hermann Kaufmann Architects, Schwarzach (Austria)

    Wednesday, February 7, 2018
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Live-streaming of this event will be available here.

    Woodworks – Evolution of Wood Based Construction Systems

    Christoph Dünser is an Austrian Architect and the partner of Hermann Kaufmann Architects (Schwarzach, Austria), along with Stefan Hiebeler and Roland Wehinger. Christoph’s career path parallels the surge in the use of wood and, in fact, is epitomized in his presentation – demonstrating increasing competence and understanding of how wood can be used in small projects and how this experience leads to effective use of this natural material in increasingly large and more complex projects.

    Christoph has been the lead designer for a wide variety of innovative wood structures, from small, remote passive design residential structures using CLT, to multi-family residential buildings, to larger commercial and institutional buildings. In 2010 he began working on a breakthrough building that brought together composite design, prefabrication, ultra-high performance and rapid construction. That project culminated in Life Cycle Tower 1 in Dornbirn Austria, an 8-storey tall structure made using pre-fabricated, mixed-material elements and was erected in 8 days in March 2012. He has also worked with Acton Ostry Architects on the tallest contemporary wood structure in the world, the 18-stories Brock Commons Building at UBC.

    With his passion for timber construction, Christoph will be discussing how wood can offer significant solutions for the future of the built environment. Wood sets limits, yet allows mani­fold applications. It is precisely these challenges that make designing and building with wood so fascinating and make successful projects such an exciting source of inspiration for the future. Christoph suggests that constructing with wood is an ideal option as the material is produced by energy from the sun, and absorbs and stores CO2 from the atmosphere. In addition, wood can be adequately disposed of and recycled and requires little energy to be worked – compared to metals, plastics and min­eral-based construction materials.

     

    Please register for free admission before attending – registration will open January 2018. This event is free and open to the general public. If you have a Ryerson e-mail address, please use it to register for reserved seating. The “Ryerson” ticket option will appear once the valid e-mail has been provided.

    There is no need to print the confirmation e-mail. The registration confirmation e-mail can be shown at the door, or the name used to register can be provided.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Christoph DünserPortrait of Christoph Dünser

    Lecture: Christoph Dünser

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  • Elena Casanova Portrait

    Photo courtesy of Casanova + Hernandez Architects

    Lecture: Helena Casanova

    25/01/2018

    Helena Casanova
    Casanova + Hernandez Architects, Rotterdam

    Thursday, January 25, 2018
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Live-streaming of this event will be available here.

    Building Knowledge in Interdisciplinary Design

    Co-sponsored by the Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Margery Winkler Lecture Fund

    Helena Casanova (Madrid, 1967) is a Spanish architect based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Since 2000, she has also been a registered architect at the Dutch SBA. Casanova+Hernandez, founded in 2001 by Helena Casanova and Jesús Hernández, is a design and research studio with a focus on rethinking and designing the urban habitat in order to create environmentally and socially sustainable cities. Casanova+Hernandez has won international competitions such as the Marubi National Photo Museum in Albania, the Ceramic Museum in Jinzhou, China, the master plan for Lichterfelde Süd in Berlin, the Cooltower in Rotterdam, Europan 6 in Groningen and Europan 7 in the Netherlands (The Hague). Working with an interdisciplinary team and with experience developing projects in very different cultural contexts in Europe, South America, and Asia, the office has expanded its capabilities and its international network through close and fruitful collaboration with experts in different continents.

    Between 2009 and 2013 Helena was a member of the Architecture Commission at the Dutch Architecture Fund (SFA / Stimuleringsfonds voor Creatieve Industrie). She has been a visiting lecturer and critic since 2002 at different Schools of Architecture such as TU Delft, Chalmers School of Architecture in Goteborg (where she has been the Visiting Censor as well), Artesis in Antwerp, MaHKU in Utrecht and the AvB of Rotterdam, Anrhem and Amsterdam. She has been a guest professor in educational institutions such as the Berlage Institute in the Netherlands, the School of Architecture at the Shenzhen University and the Lebanese American University. She has been invited as a jury member to different international competitions.

    Together with Jesús Hernández, she has authored several books such as ‘Building Knowledge in Interdisciplinary Design’ (2015, Damdi Publishers, Seoul), ‘Public Space Acupuncture’ (2014, Actar Publishers, New York) and ‘Scale and Perception’ (2013, Wasmuth Publishers, Berlin). She is the co-founder and board member of the new Europan NL organization. Her work has been shown throughout Europe, US, South America, Australia and Asia through lectures, exhibitions, debates, and publications.

     

    Please register for free admission before attending. This event is free and open to the general public. If you have a Ryerson e-mail address, please use it to register for reserved seating. The “Ryerson” ticket option will appear once the valid e-mail has been provided.

    There is no need to print the confirmation e-mail. The registration confirmation e-mail can be shown at the door, or the name used to register can be provided.

    Free copies of the January/February Issue of AZURE Magazine will be available at the door!


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Helena CasanovaElena Casanova Portrait

    Lecture: Helena Casanova

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  • Building Science Lectures

    JAN
    24
    Peter LoveLunchtime Guest Talk With Peter Love | Climate Change, Conservation and What You Can Do
    12:00 PM | The PIT (ARC 202)

    Peter will speak about climate change as the most important environmental issue to face mankind and the role of man made greenhouse gas emissions. He will highlight the fact that 81% of Canada’s man-made greenhouse gas emissions come from the production of use of energy. He will also note that 2/3 of the energy consumed in Canada is wasted in conversion. Based on this, he will summarize the importance of energy conservation, the benefits of conservation and its challenges. He will refer specifically to what you can do at home, at work and in school.

    NOV
    29
    Dr. Ian HamiltonGuest Talk With Dr. Ian Hamilton | Improving the Energy Performance of Buildings
    4:00 PM | The PIT (ARC 202)

    Dr. Ian Hamilton will be discussing the impact of health and wellbeing in improving the energy performance of buildings. Hamilton is an Associate Professor at the UCL Energy Institute, University College London, UK, and his research focuses on the nexus between energy demand, energy efficiency, indoor environmental conditions, and health.

    NOV
    10
    Dr. Da YanLunchtime Guest Talk With Dr. Da Yan | Occupant Behavior Modelling for Building Simulation: Current Status & Future Challenges
    12:00 PM | The PIT (ARC 202)

    Buildings consume more than one-third of the world’s primary energy. Improving the energy performance of buildings is essential to sustainable development and mitigation of global climate change. Dr. Da Yan will outline his state-of-the-art research of occupant behaviour simulation in buildings. The presentation will present progress and challenges, as well as future perspectives in occupant behaviour research.

    No RSVP is required. Show up early to secure your seat!

    Building Science LecturesIMG_8269-bsc-lectures

    Building Science Lectures

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  • 325 Magazine

    325 Magazine is a non-profit, student-run publication which showcases the excellent and innovative ideas stemming out of Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science. Annually, we print over a thousand copies that become distributed department-wide, to both students and faculty, and to local firms in Toronto. The publication features a range of undergraduate and graduate student submitted work – every student has the opportunity to submit their work for consideration. Our team consists of students from all years of the program who work together to design and curate each issue. We believe that 325 Magazine is a celebration of student achievement, and is essential to the Ryerson architecture student community as it provides an opportunity for student involvement and serves as a vehicle for sharing our work with the AEC industry. 325 Magazine also continues to use a sustainable waterless method of printing, as the environmental benefits are worthwhile, and ensures every student who receives a free copy of 325 does so in good conscience.

    325 Magazine 2015-2016 Cover 325 Magazine | 2015 – 2016
    Editor-in-Chief: Jennifer Pham
    Read this issue
    325 Magazine 2014-2015 Cover 325 Magazine | 2014 – 2015
    Editor-in-Chief: Sarah Lipsit
    Read this issue
    325 Magazine 2013-2014 Cover 325 Magazine | 2013 – 2014
    Editor-in-Chief: Sarah Lipsit
    Read this issue
    325 Magazine 2012-2013 Cover 325 Magazine | 2012 – 2013
    Editor-in-Chief: Naveed Khan
    Read this issue
    325 MagazineIMG_8450

    325 Magazine

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  • Photograph of professors (from left to right) Hitesh Doshi, Paul Poh, Zaiyi Liao, Yew-Thong Leong, Albert Smith, and Kendra Schank Smith (Ramani Ramakrishnan not pictured) by Spencer Turcotte

    Photograph of professors (from left to right) Hitesh Doshi, Paul Poh, Zaiyi Liao, Yew-Thong Leong, Albert Smith, and Kendra Schank Smith (Ramani Ramakrishnan not pictured) by Spencer Turcotte

    DAS Team Wins Bid for Frank Lloyd Wright Banff Pavilion Update

    For 25 years, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Banff Pavilion stood on the bank of the Bow River, a testament to Prairie style and social functionality. However, after over two decades of detrimental freezing and flooding, the Banff Pavilion was demolished. The site stood vacant and unpurposed for the next 78 years, until a team of Ryerson University professors entered a bid in the FLW Revival Initiative.

    On August 31, 2017, Ryerson University won the right to update Frank Lloyd Wright’s Banff Pavilion. A team of seven Ryerson professors, nominally led by Professor Yew-Thong Leong, will draw the plans reconstructing Wright’s vision of the Banff Pavilion. Ryerson won the bid for a reason. In recent coverage by the Ryersonian, Leong notes that “We took a team approach, something we felt would be very important to be successful not just in winning the bid but also completing the project. All seven of us are equal contributors and the FLW Revival Initiative recognized our individual strengths, our aggregate abilities and the team spirit we brought to the proposal.” The project involves taking the original plans of the Banff Pavilion and faithfully representing them in 21st century standards.

    The design team consists of seven Ryerson professors, now affectionately called the Group of 7. It includes architects and engineers with specialties in historical restoration, environmental systems and controls, project management, and architectural modeling and building performance. The team’s collaborative approach and diversity of skills made sure the bid was a team effort, and a team win.

    The Banff Pavilion was the only public building Frank Lloyd Wright designed in Canada. Leong notes that this is a project that “is something that an architect would never even dream of, nevermind get the chance to work on. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity…” The FLW Pavilion location is sited well, and it is the team’s intent to reproduce the building faithfully while completing secondary research that contributes to a body of knowledge and to educational engagement. This project is a design collaboration that intends to remediate the site’s flooding and prevent future instances of environmental damage while creating a space for the future. Once completed the revived FLW Banff Pavilion will house events from social gatherings to weddings while faithfully representing the vision of the original building. This is truly a project of revival and long-lasting legacy to be realized through the focus and collaboration of Ryerson’s team. Leong aptly notes that “Architecture is all teamwork. The whole concept of a star-architect is a myth, and we – and I – work hard to break that perception.

    After the original FLW Banff Pavilion was demolished its legacy existed only in drawings and linen, a small reminder of the scope of a building that represented the confluence of prairie design and social purpose. The Banff Pavilion will be loyally recreated in its original design, and after nearly 100 years once again stand to serve local community pursuits.

    We are thrilled to be part of this project,” says Leong. This departmental legacy will give those at Ryerson a connection to their very own Canadian Frank Lloyd Wright building, a treasure of rare proportions. “We hope our research and work will make a significant contribution to both international architecture study and the community of Banff. This is an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for any architect or scholar−particularly from Canada.”

    Be sure to visit Yew-Thong Leong’s personal chronicle of the journey working on the Frank Lloyd Wright Banff Pavilion.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

     

    DAS Team Wins Bid for Frank Lloyd Wright Banff Pavilion UpdatePhotograph of professors (from left to right) Hitesh Doshi, Paul Poh, Zaiyi Liao, Yew-Thong Leong, Albert Smith, and Kendra Schank Smith (Ramani Ramakrishnan not pictured) by Spencer Turcotte

    DAS Team Wins Bid for Frank Lloyd Wright Banff Pavilion Update

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  • Portrait of Oliver David Krieg

    Photo courtesy of Oliver David Krieg

    Lecture: Oliver David Krieg

    30/10/2017

    Oliver David Krieg
    Institute for Computational Design (ICD),
    University of Stuttgart, Germany

    Monday, October 30, 2017
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    This event will be unavailable on the DAS YouTube channel. It will not be live-streamed.


    Research in Computational Design and Digital Fabrication

    Oliver David Krieg is an expert in computational design and digital fabrication in architecture. His research is characterized by a focus on integrative processes and close collaborations between engineering, biology, material science, sustainability analysis, building physics, and fabrication. As a research associate and doctoral candidate at the Institute for Computational Design and Construction at the University of Stuttgart, his work aims to employ the reciprocities between technology and material characteristics in order to rethink how architecture will be designed, fabricated, and constructed in the future.

    With a profound interest in computational design processes and robotic fabrication in architecture, Oliver has led and participated in several research and built projects around the world that explore new potentials in timber construction. Working with wood as a natural but highly performative building material with differentiated properties, has enabled novel potentials that allows for exceedingly individualised and complex building elements and construction systems. In order to unlock this potential, an interdisciplinary and multi-facetted approach is required. The resulting material systems and prototypes evaluate the structural and spatial possibilities, ultimately pushing the boundaries of today’s architectural design research.

    Oliver David Krieg has taught workshops at the RobArch 2012 and RobArch 2016 conferences, at UBC Vancouver and Tongji University Shanghai, and has given lectures at several national and international conferences in architectural design and timber construction. He has also been teaching seminars and studios at the University of Stuttgart in the context of his research since 2012. For the duration of his dissertation, Oliver is a scholarship holder of the German National Academic Foundation. His projects at the ICD have won many national and international awards and have been published in numerous magazines worldwide.

     


    This event is free and open to the public, no RSVP is required.
    Show up early to secure your seat.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Oliver David KriegPortrait of Oliver David Krieg

    Lecture: Oliver David Krieg

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