• Portrait of Oliver David Krieg

    Photo courtesy of Oliver David Krieg

    Lecture: Oliver David Krieg

    30/10/2017

    Oliver David Krieg
    Institute for Computational Design (ICD),
    University of Stuttgart, Germany

    Monday, October 30, 2017
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    This event will be unavailable on the DAS YouTube channel. It will not be live-streamed.


    Research in Computational Design and Digital Fabrication

    Oliver David Krieg is an expert in computational design and digital fabrication in architecture. His research is characterized by a focus on integrative processes and close collaborations between engineering, biology, material science, sustainability analysis, building physics, and fabrication. As a research associate and doctoral candidate at the Institute for Computational Design and Construction at the University of Stuttgart, his work aims to employ the reciprocities between technology and material characteristics in order to rethink how architecture will be designed, fabricated, and constructed in the future.

    With a profound interest in computational design processes and robotic fabrication in architecture, Oliver has led and participated in several research and built projects around the world that explore new potentials in timber construction. Working with wood as a natural but highly performative building material with differentiated properties, has enabled novel potentials that allows for exceedingly individualised and complex building elements and construction systems. In order to unlock this potential, an interdisciplinary and multi-facetted approach is required. The resulting material systems and prototypes evaluate the structural and spatial possibilities, ultimately pushing the boundaries of today’s architectural design research.

    Oliver David Krieg has taught workshops at the RobArch 2012 and RobArch 2016 conferences, at UBC Vancouver and Tongji University Shanghai, and has given lectures at several national and international conferences in architectural design and timber construction. He has also been teaching seminars and studios at the University of Stuttgart in the context of his research since 2012. For the duration of his dissertation, Oliver is a scholarship holder of the German National Academic Foundation. His projects at the ICD have won many national and international awards and have been published in numerous magazines worldwide.

     


    This event is free and open to the public, no RSVP is required.
    Show up early to secure your seat.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Oliver David KriegPortrait of Oliver David Krieg

    Lecture: Oliver David Krieg

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  • Photograph of ZeroHouse interior by Tom Arban.

    Photograph of ZeroHouse interior by Tom Arban.

    ECOstudio: Zero Energy Housing for the Future

    Rendering of Zero House by Matthew Ferguson

    Rendering of Zero House by Matthew Ferguson

    The ZeroHousing project suggests a new typology for holistic mid-rise housing design. Alternative construction materials, prefabricated construction, and building integrated solar panels make architecture part of the solution to climate change, not part of the problem.


    Architecture professor Cheryl Atkinson, one of four Ryerson faculty members behind Ecostudio, partnered with the Endeavour Centre to design and build a 1100-square-foot sustainable prototype called Zero House. Reassembled onsite for EDITdx, you can tour this net-zero energy, stacked townhouse from September 28th to October 8th, 2017 at the Unilever 21 Don Roadway Toronto.

    As an alternative to low- and high-rise sprawl, the team has aimed to address the need for affordable, sustainable, mid-rise urban housing through research, design, and prototyping. Students from Ryerson, the Endeavour Centre, Seneca, and Ted Rogers worked together to design a toxin-free, carbon-neutral, all-natural housing unit using recycled materials.

     

     MIDRISE SOLAR: THE BIG PICTURE

     

    There is definitely a “Missing Middle” of mid-rise housing. Mid-rise housing is already significantly more energy efficient that single family homes and wood-frame construction has a significantly lower carbon footprint than high-rises.
    — Cheryl Atkinson

    Interior of Zero House

    While there are various freestanding net-zero houses built recently in Canada, there are virtually no local precedents for energy-neutral midrise housing. By integrating innovative peel and stick solar collectors on both their south facing façades and roofs, the lower units of midrise buildings can also be solar powered. In high latitude countries like Canada, vertically oriented solar collectors on facades can collect adequate low altitude solar energy.

    In a city that is growing at a rate of 100,000 newcomers a year, commercial development has offered mostly high-rise towers or suburban sprawl. ECOstudio is designing and developing options for the something in-between, midrise stacked townhouses over retail that allows for the affordability and sustainability of pre-fab wood construction. By building on arterials within existing communities, this project reinforces existing social and physical services including schools, jobs, transit, water, sewers and infrastructure for sustainable housing at all scales.

     

    REDUCING ENERGY LOAD

     

    Rendering by Matthew Ferguson

    Rendering of solarBLOCK by Matthew Ferguson

    High energy efficiency has been achieved by utilizing a highly-insulated, airtight yet breathable envelope of all-natural, sustainably sourced, carbon-sequestering materials, energy efficient appliances, fixtures, and air source heat pumps. The Endeavour Centre has experimented with a variety of ‘natural’ construction materials like strawbale, blown-in cellulose, recycled wood, paper cartons, wool, and like mycelium board derived from mushrooms; to eliminate toxins as well as GHG emissions.

    This project is a prototype build exploring a variety of systems, materials, and techniques, and will be a tool to create public awareness and assess the market potential of the concepts. A larger, more elaborated version of this unit, the solarBLOCK, will be developed for permanent display and research at the BRE (Building Research Establishment) Innovation Park at the Living Campus at the Kortright Centre, Kleinberg Ontario, where it will be one of seven test ‘homes.’

     

    THE TEAM

     

    The architectural design was supervised by Architect and Associate Professor Cheryl Atkinson of Ryerson, Department of Architectural Science. The mechanical and solar system design is supervised by Professional Engineer and Associate Professor Dr. Alan Fung of Ryerson, Mechanical Engineering, in collaboration with Kyle Valdock of Seneca College, Engineering Technology department. Business development is supervised by Associate Professor Dr. Philip Walsh of Ryerson, Ted Rogers School of Management. Construction methods, Natural Building science and research and material sourcing is led by Chris Magwood of the Endeavour Centre with design and construction instructors Shane MacInnes and Jen Feigin.

     

    The lead student members of the Ryerson team are:

    Jamie Fine, Ph.D. Candidate – Project Management
    Matthew Ferguson, MArch Student – Architecture
    Danilo Yu, Ph.D. Candidate – Mechanical, Electrical, and Controls Systems
    Brandon Wilbur, MASc Student – Mechanical Systems
    Joshua Goodfield, MASc Student – Sponsorship
    Tamoril-Dembeck Kerekes, MASc Student – Building Science
    Cristina Mazza – Corporate Secretary

     

    Endeavour Team Members:

    We would also like to thank the following independent Design Consultants
    Roland Romcohlthoff, Principal, RAW Architects
    Paul Dowsette, Sustainable TO Architects
    Julian Battiston, Oben Flats Development
    Jack Keays, Principal, Vortex Fire Consulting Inc.
    David Moses, Principal, Moses Structures

    ECOstudio: Zero Energy Housing for the FuturePhotograph of ZeroHouse interior by Tom Arban.

    ECOstudio: Zero Energy Housing for the Future

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  • Photographer: Shanuja Nagarathinam

    TimberFever 2017

    In 2016, Moses Structural Engineers collaborated with Ryerson University to host the second annual TimberFever competition, where architectural science and civil engineering students from universities across Ontario are put to the test as they design and build a life-size structure out of wood. The event was a huge success with over 50 Architecture and Civil Engineering students competing and many student volunteers.

     

    Now in its third year running, the TimberFever Design-Build Challenge continues to encourage developing design, construction and communication skills that will be invaluable to future careers in architecture and engineering. Join us for this four-day design-build competition from September 21-24, 2017 at Ryerson University. The TimberFever Awards Ceremony will be held on Sunday September 24 at 4 p.m. in the Sears Atrium, George Vari Engineering Building, located at 245 Church St.

     

    For more information, visit TimberFever’s official website.

    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    TimberFever 201714556591_1075668015884678_4496187261734679026_o

    TimberFever 2017

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  • Awards Night 2017

    Every year, the awards committee at DAS selects and rewards the best students at an official awards ceremony. The night features an exhibit of posters prepared by the recipients which will be on display from November 17th until December 1st.

     

    Awards Exhibition: November 17 – December 1, 2017

     

    Paul H. Cocker Gallery
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario
    M-T 9am – 5:00pm, F 9am – 4:30pm (closed during the weekend)

    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Awards Night 2017ryerson-arch-sci-awards-ryerson-402-photo-by-robin-cymbaly--nov12_14_15721653670_o

    Awards Night 2017

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  • Photograph of the installation by Dominic Ali.

    Photograph by Dominic Ali.

    Architecture and National Identity: The Centennial Projects 50 Years On

    Architecture and National Identity: The Centennial Projects 50 Years On Exhibition
    14 September – 10 November, 2017
    Reception: Thursday, September 14, 2017 @6:30PM
    Paul H. Cocker Gallery

    The Centennial Projects are a series of major works of architecture resulting from several federal government programs leading up to the Centennial of Confederation in 1967. The ambitions of these programs, which amounted to a gigantic public building campaign, went beyond the strictly utilitarian, aiming to uncover and give form to the identity of a modern nation entering its second century of existence.

    Between 1964 and 1970, the Centennial Grants Program and the Centennial Memorial Program provided funding for over 2,300 projects across the country, including some 860 buildings, many of which are important landmarks in their communities; several are important works within the development of Canadian modern architecture. In this exhibition, curators Marco Polo and Colin Ripley present 21 of the most important of the buildings to emerge from the Centennial programs. These are organized loosely into three themes: Building the New; Brutalism and Landscape; and National Identity and Regional Difference.

    All the buildings presented from the National Arts Centre in Ottawa to the UFO Landing Pad in St. Paul, Alberta, are documents of this particular moment in Canadian life and culture. The Centennial Projects, in youthfulness and vigour of their design, matched well to the youthfulness, vigour, and optimism of Canada in the 1960s. Now, 50 years on, it is time to re-examine this remarkable moment in Canadian architecture.

    Paul H. Cocker Gallery
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario
    M-T 9am – 5:00pm, F 9am – 4:30pm (closed during the weekend)

    For further information, please contact:

    Alexandra Berceanu
    Communications and Digital & Analogue Archive Specialist
    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353
    E: alexandra.berceanu@ryerson.ca
    http://www.arch.ryerson.ca/

    Architecture and National Identity: The Centennial Projects 50 Years OnPhotograph of the installation by Dominic Ali.

    Architecture and National Identity: The Centennial Projects 50 Years On

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  • Photo of Alykhan Neky

    Alykhan Neky (M.Arch) one of three students in Canada to Receive the 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize Scholarship

    This highly competitive and prestigious $5,000 scholarship is awarded for an illustrated 1,000-word essay. Neky believes that “architecture [can] foster self-reliance” for communities facing the challenges of poverty in the developing world. His conviction grew during a research trip to rapidly changing Masailand in Kenya, where he saw a sharp contrast between traditional buildings and architectural styles imported from the industrialized West. In efforts to mitigate this tension, Neky explores the role of the architect in the creation of vernacular-inspired contemporary buildings that serve as expressions of collective culture. The building designs he has proposed for a rural Maasai community in Kenya have received significant funding for construction. Consistent with vernacular building traditions, Neky’s designs use local materials and embrace the notion of “self-building,” thus empowering Maasai women, the traditional builders in this society.

    Rendering of Butterfly House Architectural Design

    Rendering of Butterfly House Architectural Design

    The distinguished jury, which included principals of major architectural firms, the editor of Canadian Architect, the founding director of Laurentian University’s McEwen School of Architecture, and a member of the Order of Canada, described Neky’s work as “an ambitious vision for how the author plans to use his training as an architect to address third-world living conditions in a culturally sensitive manner.”

    The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) and the RAIC Foundation received 180 eligible entries from students enrolled in Canada’s 11 accredited schools of architecture. The Moriyama RAIC International Prize Scholarship provides students with an excellent opportunity to reflect on and direct their research interests.

    Alykhan Neky (M.Arch) one of three students in Canada to Receive the 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize ScholarshipPhoto of Alykhan Neky

    Alykhan Neky (M.Arch) one of three students in Canada to Receive the 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize Scholarship

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  • Heather Dubbeldam

    Photo courtesy of Dubbeldam Architecture + Design

    Lecture: Heather Dubbeldam

    28/09/2017

    Heather Dubbeldam
    Dubbeldam Architecture + Design,
    Toronto

    Thursday, September 28, 2017
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Live-streaming of this event will be available here.

     

    The Next Green: Innovation in Sustainability Through Design

    Heather Dubbeldam is a Toronto-based architect and designer who comes by her professional passion for architecture honestly; as a fourth generation architect, she carries on the modernist approach of her Dutch lineage. Heather is the principal of Dubbeldam Architecture + Design, a multi-disciplinary studio committed to advancing an architectural and social agenda through built work and design research. Central to the practice is the exploration of contemporary architectural issues in which a desire to improve the public realm figures prominently—demonstrated not only by professional advocacy but by the projects undertaken by the studio. Recognized by numerous awards for design excellence and practice, Dubbeldam’s work has garnered wide recognition in local, national and international publications.

    Dubbeldam is the recipient of the 2016 Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture from the Canada Council, one of the oldest and most prestigious prizes in architecture, created to recognize outstanding achievement in Canadian architecture. This prize will support the firm’s research project entitled ‘The Next Green – Innovation in Sustainable Housing’, which entails travel to Scandinavia and Germany to study sustainable housing precedents and research for northern climates. Dubbeldam’s broad areas of study include a focus on resiliency, responsive design, and innovative sustainable design and systems, exploring how architects in these countries set new standards for sustainable buildings while developing a unique spatial and artistic architectural language in which energy efficiency and design merge seamlessly.  Having recently returned from her first research trip in Denmark, Heather will be presenting her firm’s Prix de Rome research to date.

     

    Please register for free admission before attending.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Heather DubbeldamHeather Dubbeldam

    Lecture: Heather Dubbeldam

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  • Lecture: Jacques Ferrier

    26/10/2017

    Jacques Ferrier
    Jacques Ferrier Architecture,
    Limoux

    Thursday, October 26, 2017
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Live-streaming of this event will be available here.

     

    Architecture as a Non-Oppressive Design

     

    Headquarters of The Métropole Rouen Normandie, completed July 2017. Photo by Luc Boegly.

    Headquarters of The Métropole Rouen Normandie, completed July 2017.
    Photo by Luc Boegly.

    Jacques Ferrier is an architect and urban planner. Following his architectural training at the École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Belleville and the École Centrale de Paris, Jacques Ferrier created his own architecture firm in Paris in 1993 and has since worked both in France and on the international stage. His portfolio of work includes cultural facilities (such as the France Pavilion for Expo 2010 Shanghai and the Musée de la Voile in Lorient in Brittany), showcase buildings (such as the head office of Champagnes Piper-Heidsieck & Charles Heidsieck in Reims, the head office of publishers Hachette Livre in Vanves, near Paris and the Airbus Delivery Centre in Toulouse), public buildings (notably the Collège de France in Paris and the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme in Nantes) and research centres, as well as urban development projects that chime with the ethos and philosophy of the agency: to create architecture and cities that contribute to a sustainable society.

    With projects such as Belle Méditerranée, Concept Office and Hypergreen, in partnership with famous industrials, Jacques Ferrier has also undertaken innovative research activities.

    His humanistic vision for tomorrow’s cities finds its full expression in the concept of the Sensual City – an urban proposal developed for the France Pavilion in Shanghai – which seeks to answer the question of what urban design and planning should today be, and which is to be continued through his mission as consultant for the design and architecture of the Grand Paris rapid transit.

    In 2010, Jacques Ferrier and Pauline Marchetti created, in collaboration with the philosopher Philippe Simay, the Sensual City Studio, a research laboratory devoted to a forward-looking, humanistic and sensitive approach to the city and architecture.
    Jacques Ferrier is the author of a number of works and articles on the subject of architecture. His architectural work has been the subject of many publications in France and abroad.

    He is qualified to teach in French architectural schools (as “Professeur des Écoles d’Architecture”), and he has been the recipient of a number of prizes and awards – in particular the Prix de la Première Oeuvre du Moniteur (awarded by the journal Le Moniteur) – and has been nominated three times for the Grand Prix National d’Architecture. He has been made both a Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Mérite and a Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres.

     

    Please register for free admission before attending. If you have a Ryerson e-mail address, please use it to register for reserved seating. The “Ryerson” ticket option will appear once the valid e-mail has been provided.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Jacques FerrierJacques Ferrier, architecte.

    Lecture: Jacques Ferrier

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  • Brad Cloepfil

    Photo courtesy of Allied Works

    Lecture: Brad Cloepfil

    09/11/2017

    Brad Cloepfil
    Allied Works, Portland & New York

    Thursday, November 9, 2017
    6:30 PM | The Pit (ARC 202)
    Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario

    Live-streaming of this event will be available here.


    Title: Case Work

    Architect, educator, and principal of Allied Works Architecture, Brad Cloepfil creates culturally resonant architectural designs that are forged by the defining elements of their mission and site. Cloepfil’s earliest influences lay outside the field of architecture—from the vast landscapes and monumental works of civil engineering in the Pacific Northwest, to the simple yet profoundly affecting gestures of land and installation artists. One of his earliest defining projects was the Maryhill Overlook, completed in 1998, the first in a series of site-specific interventions and installation designs in diverse landscapes across the Pacific Northwest. In the years since, his body of work has continued to be as informed by the history of place as it is by his formal training. His approach to design combines a research-intensive focus on the specific character of each project with an understanding of the transformative possibilities of architecture.

    Cloepfil has received particular acclaim for his work on creative and cultural projects and for crafting powerful spaces for art and interaction. These works include the recently completed “Studio Bell” National Music Centre of Canada, in Calgary, Alberta; the Clyfford Still Museum in Denver, Colorado; the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis; the Museum of Arts and Design in New York; the Seattle Art Museum; the University of Michigan Museum of Art; the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts in the Dallas Arts District; and the Schnitzer Center for Art and Design at the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon. Allied Works was also one of two finalists for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s expansion to house the Modern and Contemporary Art Galleries.

    Cloepfil has also designed private residences, offices, and creative workspaces, such its design for Wieden + Kennedy Agency; the Dutchess County Estate in Stanfordville, New York; and Pixar Animation Studios in Emeryville, California. Current projects include a U.S. Embassy compound in Maputo, Mozambique; the National Veterans’ Memorial Museum in Columbus, Ohio; and studio and production spaces for Theory and Helmut Lang in New York City.

    Cloepfil founded Allied Works Architecture in his native Portland, Oregon, in 1994, and opened the New York City office in 2003. The recipient of numerous design awards, Cloepfil has held professorships and lectured widely throughout North America and Europe. He earned his bachelor’s in architecture at the University of Oregon, and holds an advanced degree in architectural design from the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture.

     

    Registration details to follow.


    For further information, please contact:

    Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University
    325 Church Street
    Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
    Canada
    P: 416-979-5000, ext: 2597
    F: 416-979-5353

    Lecture: Brad CloepfilBrad Cloepfil

    Lecture: Brad Cloepfil

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  • Photo of Bata Shoe Museum Provincial Emblems

    Photo by Remi Carreiro

    DAS Students Collaborate with the Bata Shoe Museum to Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary

    Polishing BackdropTo celebrate the anniversary of Canada’s Confederation, students from DAS have designed a window installation for the Bata Shoe Museum through [R]ed[U]x Lab. The display — In Full Bloom: Celebrating Canada 150, is the second installation from our students after foot[age], a collaboration between Architectural Science and Interior Design.

    Led by Lisa Boulatova with John Zhang and Liam Hall, along with help from other students in the department, the display was revealed to the public on Canada Day, July 1st, 2017. This design draws upon the provincial and territorial flowers as a unifying element wrapping around the prominent window. Composed of an array of 3D printed shoes, the installation undulates beyond a subtle backdrop that has been evolving for the past few months.

    [See more photos of the installation here]

    Image of CNC Machine Printing 3D Flowers

    3D Printed Shoe

    To learn more about the project, visit the students’ blog and the Ryerson Design Lab blog.

    DAS Students Collaborate with the Bata Shoe Museum to Celebrate Canada’s 150th AnniversaryPhoto of Bata Shoe Museum Provincial Emblems

    DAS Students Collaborate with the Bata Shoe Museum to Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary

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